Dreena Burton https://dreenaburton.com Trusted Whole Food Vegan Recipes Wed, 26 Sep 2018 18:52:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Spanish Rice (vegan, gluten-free, oil-free, nut-free) https://dreenaburton.com/spanish-rice-vegan-gluten-free-oil-free-nut-free/ https://dreenaburton.com/spanish-rice-vegan-gluten-free-oil-free-nut-free/#comments Wed, 26 Sep 2018 18:52:37 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8615 This Spanish Rice recipe has been recreated from a childhood dish I ate often. We all have food memories from our childhood, right? Some we remember with distaste (ugh jigs dinner, fried caplin, cod tongues, and liver). Others we remember with fondness – like this Spanish Rice. As I’ve mentioned before, my mom had six...

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This Spanish Rice recipe has been recreated from a childhood dish I ate often.
We all have food memories from our childhood, right?

Some we remember with distaste (ugh jigs dinner, fried caplin, cod tongues, and liver).
Others we remember with fondness – like this Spanish Rice.
one-pot SPANISH RICE: #vegan #glutenfree #soyfree #oilfree #glutenfree #nutfree #meatfree #meatless #recipe #food #healthy #meatlessmonday #lentils #rice
As I’ve mentioned before, my mom had six children, all girls. She cooked many dishes from scratch, and her Spanish Rice was in regular meal rotation.
I don’t know where my mom’s Spanish Rice dish originated from. I figure she found the recipe in a magazine and cut it out, or it was passed along in a handwritten note by a friend.
Remember when we did that??
Tore out recipes from magazine and added them to a binder with handwritten favorites?
There was something so special and treasured about those homemade cookbooks.
Or, my mother may have ‘winged it’. She did that often, as I do.
When you cool often you don’t need to measure ingredients all the time. You just go by texture, smell, flavor, and build on those elements as you go.
What was always characteristic about this Spanish Rice is that it always contained corn, chopped bell peppers, rice, and beef. It was more of a casserole than a stew, just prepped on the stove.
For years I wanted to veganize this dish from childhood. I didn’t ask her for the recipe. I’m not sure if she still has it in her collection of hand-written recipes.
I just began building the textures and flavors as I remembered. After a few trials, I think I came pretty close! It’s a comforting dish with homey flavors and textures.
Best of all, this Spanish Rice is so simple to prepare. Get it all into a pot and let the magic begin!
I hope this Spanish Rice becomes a family favorite for you as well.
Enjoy! x Dreena

Spanish Rice

  • 2 tbsp water ((ore more if needed))
  • 1 1/2 cups diced onion
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 – 1 1/4 tsp sea salt (start with 1 tsp)
  • black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup dry green lentils (or french (le puy lentils))
  • 3 – 3 1/4 cups water
  • 1-2 bay leaves
  • 1 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 2 1/2 – 3 cups precooked brown rice (see note if using uncooked rice)
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp pure maple syrup
  • 3/4 – 1 cup corn kernels (can use frozen)
  • extra salt/pepper to taste
  1. In a large pot over medium-high heat, add the water, onion, oregano, basil, paprika and sea salt. Stir, cover, and let cook for 5-6 minutes. If mixture is sticking, add another splash of water. Remove the cover, and add the lentils and water (starting with 3 cups). Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to low. Cook for about 35 minutes, then add the bell pepper, rice, tomato paste, vinegar, and maple syrup. Return cover and cook for another 10 minutes or until the lentils are fully cooked through. If they are still firm, add the remaining water and let cook another 5-10 minutes. Once cooked through, stir in corn kernels (let heat through for a couple of minutes if frozen corn kernels). Taste, season with additional salt or pepper as desired, and serve.

  • Rice note: If you don’t have precooked rice, use 3/4 cup of dry brown rice, and add another 1 1/2 cups of water to cook.

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Oil-free Vegan Muffins and Healthy Baked Goods (nut-free, vegan, wfpb) https://dreenaburton.com/healthy-baking-recipes-school-nut-free/ https://dreenaburton.com/healthy-baking-recipes-school-nut-free/#comments Wed, 05 Sep 2018 19:10:51 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=4468 During the school year, I have a handful of healthy vegan muffins and baked goods that are in weekly lunchbox rotation. These baked goods are all nut-free, so perfect for school snacks. People always ask “what do you pack for lunches?” To fully answer that question, I included a chapter on packing lunches in Plant-Powered...

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During the school year, I have a handful of healthy vegan muffins and baked goods that are in weekly lunchbox rotation.

HEALTHY OIL-FREE VEGAN MUFFINS & BAKING for #backtoschool! #lunches #healthy #vegan #baking #oilfree #nutfree #muffins

These baked goods are all nut-free, so perfect for school snacks.

People always ask “what do you pack for lunches?”

To fully answer that question, I included a chapter on packing lunches in Plant-Powered Families, so get all of my tips there.

10 Healthy Oil-free Muffins & Baked Snacks for Lunches! www.dreenaburton.com

Top oil-free muffins and baked goods for back-to-school

1) BEST Banana Bread (or muffins): A long-time family fave, and I cannot tell you how many tweets and notes I get saying something like “omg these are oil-free vegan muffins? No one would know!”

True.

I either make in muffins or straight up banana bread. Either way, this Plant-Powered Families‘ recipe is darn easy, and entirely fab, so go bake!

BEST Banana Bread (from Plant-Powered Families)

This quick bread is tender and so fragrant and delicious, you won’t believe it is made with whole-grain flours and no oil! And, you can just as easily turn these into muffins (see note).

  • 1 cup whole-wheat pastry flour (or 1 cup + 3-4 tbsp spelt flour for wheat-free version)
  • 3/4 cup oat flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1 cup pureed overripe banana (see note)
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup plain non-dairy milk
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 3-4 tbsp non-dairy mini or regular chocolate chips (optional)
  1. Preheat oven to 350. In a large bowl, mix dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, combine pureed banana, maple syrup, milk and vanilla. Add wet mixture to dry, and add in chocolate chips (if using), and stir through until just well combined (don’t overmix). Wipe a loaf pan lightly with oil (or use a silicone loaf pan). Pour batter into pan and bake for 43-48 minutes, until golden and a toothpick or skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Makes 1 quick bread.

If you have an immersion blender, puree several medium-large overripe bananas in a deep, large cup, then measure to get your 1 cup. If you don’t have an immersion blender, mash banana very well. To make muffins instead of a quick bread: Pour mixture into a 12-cup muffin pan fitted with cupcake liners. Bake for 17-20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Remove, let cool for a few minutes in pan, and then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely

2) Apple-Hemp Muffins: A family favorite here, and you guys can’t get enough of them either!

These pack a good dose of nutrtient-dense hemp seeds in a fragrant, tender oil-free vegan muffin. Kids can be a little fussy about eating hemp seeds, yet they won’t even know they’re in these muffins!

Apple Hemp Muffins

3) Pumpkin Seed Chocolate Chip Oat Bars I make these bars when I want a snack that will “hold up” well (ex: won’t get squished in a pocket during a field trip).

These are dense, chewy, bars that are a much healthier alternative to storebought granola bars – and far more satisfying. They keep in the fridge for over a week, and can also be frozen.

4) Oat Snackles and Pumpkin Oat Snackles

These are what I bake when I feel like I have literally 10 minutes to get something in the oven. When you make them regularly, they are that quick. The kids love them, and you can customize with dried fruit, chocolate chips, seeds, etc.

The Pumpkin Oat Snackles offer a fall twist on the classic, flip to page 59 of PPF!

Wholesome Oat Snackles

Sometimes muffins and snacks can be a little on the sweet side for parents and adults who are looking to reduce the amount of added sweeteners in their diet. While most of my baked goods such as muffins are pretty healthful, these little snackles are particularly low in sweetener. They are great for packing in lunches, or to curb midmorning cravings. It’s like having your oatmeal without the bowl!

  • 1 cup rolled oats (use certified gluten-free for that option)
  • 1 cup oat flour (use certified gluten-free for that option)
  • 1/3 cup raisins (or cranberries, or combination of both)
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened finely shredded coconut or hemp seeds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp lemon or orange zest (optional, but adds beautiful essence)
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • few pinches freshly grated nutmeg (optional, but adds extra flavor if not using zest)
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce (see note for substitution)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup (see note)
  • 2-3 tbsp non-dairy chocolate chips (optional if needing sugar-free)
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the oats, oat flour, raisins, hemp seeds, baking powder, cinnamon, zest, salt and nutmeg, stirring to mix well. Add the applesauce, maple syrup, and chocolate chips. Stir until well incorporated. Use a cookie scoop (or take spoonfuls, about 1 1⁄2 tablespoons in size) to transfer mounds of the batter to the baking sheet. Bake for 14 to 15 minutes, remove from the oven, and let cool on the pan for about a minute, then transfer to a cooling rack. Makes 12-14 snackles!

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the oats, oat flour, raisins, hemp seeds, baking powder, cinnamon, zest, salt and nutmeg, stirring to mix well. Add the applesauce, maple syrup, and chocolate chips. Stir until well incorporated. Use a cookie scoop (or take spoonfuls, about 1 1⁄2 tablespoons in size) to transfer mounds of the batter to the baking sheet. Bake for 14 to 15 minutes, remove from the oven, and let cool on the pan for about a minute, then transfer to a cooling rack. Makes 12-14 snackles!

5) Power Cookies: More so oil-free cookie treats than oil-free vegan muffins, but still healthy and chock with good stuff! I’ll be putting this new cookie in rotation this year.

Vegan Power Cookies

6) BF Blueberry Muffins: These I make less often just because the prep is a wee bit longer (not much, just slightly).

Also because we have one girl that doesn’t like berries. Hence the “BF”! With or without blueberries, they are delicious and quite a treat for oil-free vegan muffins.

BF Blueberry Muffins

BF stands for “blueberry-free” (not ‘best friend’ blueberry muffins, though that could work too)! Confused? One of our daughters doesn’t like blueberries, which baffles me. So, when I make these healthy vegan muffins, I first fill a couple of muffin liners with the batter on its own, and then the remaining with the blueberries. I don’t include this step in the directions below, but feel free to make a couple ‘BF’ blueberry muffins yourself if needed! These muffins are delicious – tender, lightly sweet, and with a hint of lemon that accents the blueberries so nicely.

  • 1 1/4 cups oat flour
  • 3/4 cup spelt flour
  • 1/3 cup unrefined sugar (light best for color, but any can be used)
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp lemon zest (amazing, don't omit!)
  • 2 tbsp non-dairy yogurt (vanilla or plain)
  • 2 tbsp pure maple syrup or agave nectar
  • 1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup + 3-4 tbsp plain non-dairy milk
  • 1/4 cup applesauce
  • 3/4 cup frozen or fresh blueberries (tossed in 1-2 tsp extra oat flour)
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, add flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda (sift in the powder/soda), salt, and lemon zest. In another bowl, first combine the yogurt with the maple syrup/agave, lemon juice, and applesauce, stirring well, and then add in the milk and stir through until well combined. Add wet ingredients to the dry, and mix through until just well combined. Then, quickly but gently, fold in the blueberries. Pour mixture into lined muffin tins (filling 10-12). Bake for 20 – 23 minutes (longer for larger muffins, less time if entire 12 muffins are filled), or until muffins are set in the centre (test by inserting a toothpick or skewer in the centre of a muffin). Remove from oven, cool for a couple of minutes in the pan, and then transfer muffins to cool on a cooling rack.

Notes:

  • Add blueberries at the very last moment, to limit the ‘bleeding’ of the blueberries into the batter.
  • Chocolate chips are wickedly good with blueberries try adding a few tablespoons to the batter.
  • Makes 10-12 muffins.

7) Berry Scuffins: Oil-free vegan muffins meet scones!

When you want a baked berry fix that’s a little quicker, this is your recipe. For the fall and winter, you can use frozen berries or substitute apple or pear – just toss in a little lemon juice first to help prevent discoloring if using these fall fruits. Berry "Scuffins" by Dreena Burton, Plant-Powered Kitchen #vegan #oilfree

8) Oatmeal Banana Bites I’ve been making these since my 13 year old was a wee babe!

They are the perfect grab ‘n go snack, for lunches or anytime of the day. Like the snackles, these are quick and like a mini-muffin without the muffin paper. These wee vegan oil-free muffins have been a reader favorite for many years.

Oatmeal Banana Bites - Healthy Vegan Muffins

Oatmeal Banana Bites

These muffin-like bites use only pureed banana as a sweetener, and as a bonus, they can be prepped in just minutes!

Idea: Try adding raisins, chopped dates, or chopped dried banana in place of the chips.

10. N0-Bake Granola Bars. Do they hold together? Yes.

Are they easy to make? Yes!

Tasty? YES!

Healthy ingredients? Yes, yes, yes!

Not a muffin, obviously, but these are perfect for school and work lunches so make it on this list!

No-Bake Granola Bars

No-Bake Granola Bars

These bars are perfect for school lunches because they are nut-free and pack very well. Plus, they are pretty simple to put together!

  • 1/2 cup brown rice syrup
  • 1/4 cup (packed) coconut butter (see note for substitution )
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup oat flour
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut (optional)
  • 1 1/2 cups natural brown rice crisp cereal
  • 3 tablespoons nondairy chocolate chips (optional)
  1. Line an 8” × 8” pan with parchment paper. In a medium saucepan over medium/medium-low heat, add the brown rice syrup, coconut butter, vanilla extract, sea salt, and cinnamon. Stir until well combined and the coconut butter has melted. Add the rolled oats, and stir through, allowing to cook for 2–3 minutes in the low heat. Add the oat flour and shredded coconut and stir through. Remove the pot from the stove. Then, quickly stir in the cereal, and transfer the mixture to the pan. Press the mixture evenly into the pan (using a nonstick spatula or piece of parchment paper to press the mixture without sticking). Wait just a minute or two, and then sprinkle on the chocolate chips (you can choose to cover whole bars, or just a portion), and press those into the base. Refrigerate until fully chilled (at least 1/2 hour), then cut in squares or bars.

  • Coconut Butter Note: Coconut butter works well here because it is so dense and helps bind the bars. Because coconut is not botanically a nut, these are also perfect for school lunches. However, if you want to substitute a nut butter, choose one that is very dense, like cashew butter.
  • Idea: Try some of these flavor variations:
    • • Raisin-spice: Try substituting raisins for the chocolate chips (and adding them with the coconut and oat flour, rather than at the end), increase the cinnamon to 1/2 teaspoon, and add 1/4 teaspoon of nutmeg and 1/8 teaspoon of allspice.
    • • Cranberry–pumpkin seed: Try substituting dried cranberries for the chocolate chips (and adding them at the same time as the oat flour), and substitute 2–3 tablespoons of pumpkin seeds for the coconut.
    • • Cocoa-hemp: Substitute 2 tablespoons of hemp seeds for the coconut, and add 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder when mixing in the oat flour and hemp seeds. Keep the chocolate chips, and add in raisins if you like!

There you have it! My favorite healthy vegan muffins and healthy goodies for packing into lunches. All of these recipes freeze well, so if you’re energized to double batches, go for it!

Oh WAIT. I have another… these Lemon Cranberry Muffins and my all-new Chocolate Zucchini Bread!

 

What are your favorite vegan oil-free muffins?

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Vegan School Lunches (and work lunches) with Tips & Recipes! (oil-free, nut-free) https://dreenaburton.com/top-10-recipes-back-to-school/ https://dreenaburton.com/top-10-recipes-back-to-school/#comments Mon, 03 Sep 2018 01:20:56 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=3246 Note Find more vegan school lunch recipes in Plant-Powered Families, plus an entire chapter on packing lunches section. Flip to page 233… and breathe easy! Does the thought of packing school lunches again make you cringe? Or work lunches? It can be frustrating to plan and pack vegan school lunches, especially now that most schools require...

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Note Find more vegan school lunch recipes in Plant-Powered Families, plus an entire chapter on packing lunches section. Flip to page 233… and breathe easy!

RECIPES & TIPS for Vegan School & Work Lunches! #vegan #lunch #lunchbox #healthy #lunches #school #nutfree #allergenfriendly #oilfree #plantbased #recipes

Does the thought of packing school lunches again make you cringe? Or work lunches?

It can be frustrating to plan and pack vegan school lunches, especially now that most schools require nut-free lunches. I’m here to help relieve some of that stress!

I’ve been packing lunches for our girls (and my hubby) for about ten years now, so I’ve learned some tricks and definitely have a school-year system.

One of my tricks is to rely on key recipes for vegan school lunches. Ones that are easy, quick, that my kids love, and that pack well for school lunches.

Today I’m sharing my top 11 recipes for vegan school lunches, along with tips!

HEALTHY VEGAN School Lunches (Recipes + TIPS) for packing school lunches!

Ready to take notes?

Class begins, now!

1. Chickpea Nibbles

I would be lost without our Chickpea Nibbles. For years I made Tamari Roasted Chickpeas (from ed&bv), and then I needed a recipe even easier. Enter Chickpea Nibbles from PPF.

I make double and triple batches of these. Seriously, my kiddos eat one batch in one sitting – easily. Sometimes I hide away extra for lunches in the fridge, just so they won’t eat them all straight away.

chickpea nibbles

Chickpea Nibbles

Your kids will love nibbling on these tasty chickpeas warm out of the oven, or cooled for lunches and snacks.

  • 2 14 / 15 oz cans chickpeas (rinsed and drained)
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp tamari
  • 1 – 1 1/2 tsp pure maple syrup
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C). Toss all ingredients together and place on baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 20-25 minutes, tossing chickpeas once or twice during baking, until marinade is absorbed but chickpeas are still a little moist (not dried out).

Chickpea Nibbles #vegan #wfpb #glutenfree #nutfree www.plantpoweredkitchen.com

What to do with them beyond snacking? Add them as a side snack in lunches, or mix into pasta, or rice/quinoa. Mash into a sandwich with your kiddos’ fave condiments. FYI, other kids may also want them. I’ve had requests. 🙂

Apron #hummusisafoodgroup #vegan #clothing #tshirt #plantbased www.plantpoweredkitchen.com

2. Hummus #hummusisafoodgroup

Hummus must be in your arsenal of vegan school lunch recipes!

Now that the hummus food group movement has officially begun, get started with my Hummus 101 from Plant-Powered Families (page 84)! If you don’t have PPF, try one of these recipes.

BIG BACK-TO-SCHOOL GIVEAWAY! Over $3000 in prizes! Foods and recipes to help pack healthy plant-based lunches. #vegan ww.dreenaburton.com

And, you know you can FREEZE hummus, right?

Yes, double or triple batch, then freeze in about 2-cup portions. It thaws beautifully, take it out the night before and pop in the fridge.

How to use in vegan school lunches? In sandwiches, slathered in wraps, as a dip for veg and rice crackers or pitas, on pizzas, as a spread for bagels or on pizzas, thinned out and mixed into pasta!

3. Easy, Nut-Free Baked Goods

Pumpkin Snackles, back-to-school recipes

It’s difficult to choose just one vegan school lunch recipe here! Some of my favorites are Best Banana Bread, Oatmeal Banana Bites, Apple Hemp Muffins, and Pumpkin Snackles. You can find most of those recipes here. Put 4-5 recipes in rotation, double-batch and freeze some if needed.

4. Simple Tofu Recipes

Simplest Marinated Tofu

Vegans don’t have to eat tofu. But, yes, vegans often do enjoy tofu! For back-to-school recipes, keep your tofu recipes very easy and with a versatile seasoning.

For years I made my “Lemon Herb Tofu” (from Vive le Vegan). Then our girls went through a phase where they were fussy about the herbs. I created my Simplest Marinated Tofu for PPF, and that has since become my staple recipe.

5. Smoothies

Either before school or after school, they are a brilliant way to nourish and sustain your kiddos in a nutrient-dense drink.

Don’t just fill them up with fruit, balance with some greens and veggies if you can, and also add nutrient-rich hemp seeds, chia seeds, goji berries, or nut butters.

Need tricks for balancing the grassy tones in green smoothies? You can get the full green smoothie tutorial here.

6. Energy Balls

These Cocoa Cookie Dough Balls are sweet enough to be in the cookie category (see 10). Still, I think Energy Balls or squares need their own category.

These are so nutrient-dense and pack a nice burst of energy while sneaking in good stuff like seeds, dried fruit, and oats. A win-win for us and the kids!

The recipe for these Cocoa Cookie Dough Balls follows, but also see the squares linked above and the Protein Power Balls in PPF.

Cocoa Cookie Dough Balls

image credit: www.ucdintegrativemedicine.com

Cocoa Cookie Dough Balls

Psst, these are really health. No need to tell the kids, or anyone else, for that matter; just eat them up knowing they are filled with almonds (nut-free option included) and oats, and sweetened only with dates and raisins!

  • 1/2 cup raw almonds (see note for nut-free option)
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tbsp rolled oats
  • A few pinches of sea salt (about a scant 1/8 tsp)
  • 1 cup pitted dates
  • 1/4 cup raisins (or more dates)
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp nondairy chocolate chips or cocoa nibs (optional)
  • A few teaspoons of unsweetened cocoa powder (unrefined sugar, or a combination of both, for dusting/rolling (optional))
  1. In a food processor, process the almods until fine and crumbly. Then add remaining ingredients and (except the optional chocolate chips) pulse or process. Once the mixture starts to become crumbly, process fully for a minute or two. It will appear as if nothing is happening at first, that the mixture is just whirring around in crumbs, but soon it will start to become sticky. When you see it start to become a little sticky, add the chocolate chips and process again. Continue to process until it forms a ball on the blade. Stop the machine and remove the dough. Take small coops of the dough (1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons in size) and roll in your hand. Repeat until you have rolled all of the dough. Toss or roll the balls in the coating, if using,, and refrigerate. Eat and repeat often.

 

  • Allergy-Free or Bust!:  For a nut-free version, replace the almonds with just 1/4 cup of raw pumkin seeds, and add another 1/4 cup of rolled oats.
  • If This Apron Could Talk:  Make a double batch and freeze half.  They thaw very well.
  • Kid-Friendly:  These are excellent to pack in school lunches, with a nut-free option for you if nuts aren’t permitted in your school. For a nut-free version, replace the almonds with just 1⁄4 cup of raw pumpkin seeds, and add another 1⁄4 cup of rolled oats.
  • Savvy Subs and Adds:  Replace vanilla with 1/2 teaspoon almond extract or orange oil.

7. Nutritious Soups

Admittedly, soups don’t top my personal list of back-to-school recipes. But I know that so many of you love to pack nutritious, hearty soups so I must include a few.

Sniffle Soup (below) is one of our girls’ favorites, and I hear it’s popular with your families too! Make it for dinner one evening (keep on thicker side), and send it to school in a thermos for the kiddos another day.

Some other soups my girls love include this Sweet Potato Bisque,  Tomato Lentil Soup, and this Smoky Bean Chili.

Sniffle Soup

8. Cheesy Sprinkle

This unassuming little recipe with nutritional yeast transforms many of our school lunches from drab to fab. I add it to pasta, and “ta-dah!”, kiddos love it.

Sometimes I’ll use a basic marinara sauce, but more often I’ll do a simple slurry of apple cider vinegar, tamari, and maple syrup (just a touch) – mix it up to taste, toss into pasta, then mix in the cheesy sprinkle. Kids LOVE this for lunch. Add in some veg or beans (there’s those tamari roasted chickpeas again!), cubed tofu or tempeh, and it’s a very satisfying lunch.

I also sprinkle it into wraps for the girls, with things like cubed potatoes and hummus, and into quinoa bowls. Many possibilities! Note that the original version is nut-based, but I offer a nut-free alternative in the recipe. This is the one I use for school lunches, and the girls really haven’t noticed the difference.

vegan school lunch recipes

9. Healthy Puddings

This may not be something you pack into vegan school lunches – though you certainly could, they are both nut-free.

If not packed, prep for after school. These puddings give a great boost of omega 3’s with chia seeds, and are delicious.

have Chocolate and Pumpkin Chia Chia Puddings posted, and a few more puddings.

10. Chickpea Salad

This chickpea salad mixture has become very popular with all of you. The recipe is in PPF, but you can also find it posted here.

Play around with the add-ins, using raisins instead of apples, omitting the celery or capers, and adding other chopped veg. It’s very versatile – and very delicious!

11. Cookies

With the school year comes school parties. Halloween, Christmas, birthdays… someone lost a tooth, someone has a new baby sister, it’s “party day”!

Yeah, I’m exaggerating a little. Still, school treats flow freely, and we need to have our cookie recipes at the ready for vegan school lunches.

My Homestyle Chocolate Chip Cookies are a classic. Also try my oil-free chippers from PPF (in this post), and the ever-popular nicer krispie squares!

Other Tips for Vegan School Lunches

– Pack lunches the day before. There is already enough chaos in the morning, so pack the lunches during lunch the day before, or the evening before.

– Also fill water bottles! Have them ready in the fridge ready to tote.

 Cook things in batches through the week and weekend. Hummus, tamari roasted chickpeas, muffins, as mentioned above. But also batch-cook potatoes, sweet potatoes, rice, quinoa, beans, etc. All those staples can be used in wraps, sandwiches, added to soups, pastas, and more.

– Pack plenty of fresh fruit and make it EASY for them to eat. Yes, it feels a nuisance sometimes to peel those mandarins or cut oranges into bite-size pieces and pop into a container. Why not just pack the whole fruit? Because kids have very little time to eat in school, that’s why. So, make it easy for them to eat that fruit. Peel or slice or cut into small pieces and pack in a container along with a fork. They are far more likely to eat it.

– Pack occasional treats – seaweed snacks, baked chips, cookies, a few vegan gummy worms. They have very healthy lunches, let them find a treat once in a while!

– Have stock of different size containers (scroll down to ‘kitchen gear for kids and lunches). I have an entire cupboard with different sizes of containers. Some are ziploc, others are reused containers from nondairy yogurt or store-bought dips, etc. The smaller ones are great for fruit and snacky items, the larger ones for pasta, sandwiches, etc. One day I may reveal my crazy cupboard of containers and lids! If you prefer a bento box, this Planetbox gets top reviews.

– We all need shortcuts. You may not always get to making marinated tofu, making soup, or baking muffins. Get some Amy’s burgers or other veg burgers that you can easily heat and put in a sandwich, and pick up healthier granola bars or snack cookies. Try Amy’s baked beans in a wrap with rice (I always add about 1 cup or more of black or kidney beans to stretch it out) or Amy’s alphabet soup – amp up the nutritional profile by adding beans, cubed potatoes or sweet potatoes, or cubed tofu. Try a pre-marinated tofu which simply needs to be sliced or lightly heated. Keep some quick fixes on hand to avoid mama (or papa) food-prep burnout!

What recipes do you rely on regularly? And, what are your go-to snacks and meals to pack into lunches. Any terrific quick-fixes to share? 

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Vegan Scalloped Potatoes https://dreenaburton.com/vegan-scalloped-potatoes/ https://dreenaburton.com/vegan-scalloped-potatoes/#comments Thu, 30 Aug 2018 20:02:15 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8590 Thanks for all your enthusiasm on last week’s post. It’s a great feeling to post and then receive your comments about being excited to make the recipe – and then how much you love it. Thank you! Today I have a recipe for Vegan Scalloped Potatoes. Like the zucchini bread, another recipe that I have...

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Thanks for all your enthusiasm on last week’s post. It’s a great feeling to post and then receive your comments about being excited to make the recipe – and then how much you love it. Thank you!

VEGAN SCALLOPED POTATOES with... SWEET SPUDS! #vegan #dairyfree #potatoes #wfpb #oilfree #nutfree #glutenfree #allergyfriendly #plantbased #recipe #scallopedpotatoes #healthy #wfpbno

Today I have a recipe for Vegan Scalloped Potatoes. Like the zucchini bread, another recipe that I have wanted to post for so long.

And I could have posted it a long time ago, because I developed this vegan scalloped potatoes recipe about um… 5 years ago!

I freshened up the recipe for the diabetes reversal cookbook. There are truly so many recipes in that book that I love and use often. As I explained before, this book is for anyone looking for delicious, whole foods vegan recipe. Not just people needing to manage diabetes.

What I love about this recipe is that it incorporates both white potatoes and our beloved sweet potatoes!

You know I love them. 😍

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes Magic Ingredient

The sweet potatoes add extra flavor, a different texture, and also more nutrition to these vegan scalloped potatoes. I really like how they break up the standard heavy potato layers. Makes the dish more interesting!

Also, the sauce is boosted with white beans, so this is more than just a spud side dish. With the beans in a creamy (nut-free!) sauce, along with the layers of potatoes and crunchy topping – these vegan scalloped potatoes take on main dish status.

Pair up with roasted vegetables or a beautiful salad with a tangy vinaigrette – you’re good to go!

Of course, you can also stretch this casserole for a side dish, serving with a main dish like seasoned tofu or tempeh, or a veggie patty or veggie loaf. Then round out with some salad, broiled green beans or another simple side veg for a wonderful meal.

Enjoy these last few days of summer, kids!

And, enjoy the vegan scalloped potatoes!

x Dreena

Scalloped Potato-Duo

Scalloped potatoes are one of those dishes I remember loving from childhood. Here, I recreate them using both white and sweet potatoes. They have all the creamy comfort- food goodness, just far more nutritious!

Potato Base:

  • 3/4 cup cannellini beans or other white beans 
1/2 cup sliced white portion of green onions (or 1/3 cup chopped shallots or onion)
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 2 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp generous sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary or 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 small clove garlic
  • 2 1/4 cups plain low-fat non-dairy milk
  • 1 1/2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tbsp tahini
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste (optional)
  • 1 – 1 1/4 lbs yukon or red potatoes (thinly sliced, peeling optional (see note))
  • 1- 1 1/4 lbs sweet potatoes (peeled (see note))

Topping:

  • 1/2 cup good quality breadcrumbs (see note for substitutions)
  • 1/2 tbsp nutritional yeast (for topping)
  • few pinches sea salt (for breadcrumb topping)

To make the potato base: In a blender, first combine the beans, green onion, nutritional yeast, Dijon mustard, sea salt, rosemary, nutmeg, garlic, milk, lemon juice, tahini, and pepper, if using. Puree until very smooth and silky. Preheat oven to 400°F. Place a tray lined with parchment paper on a lower rack to catch any possible drippings. Very lightly oil the bottom and sides of an 8" x 12" (or comparable size) casserole dish. Add a thin layer of the bean mixture to the dish and tilt back and forth so it covers the base. Then, place a layer of white potatoes (about 1/2 the total amount), followed by a layer of about 1/4 – 1/3 of the sauce mixture. The layers do not need to be completely even or measured out; it just helps to layer the potatoes with the sauce a few times to get the sauce between some of the potatoes. Repeat process, next with a layer of all the sweet potatoes, then finishing with the remaining white potatoes covered with the remaining sauce.

    To make the topping: Combine the breadcrumbs, nutritional yeast, and salt in a small bowl (see note for other ideas). Sprinkle over top of the potato and sauce mixture, and cover the dish with aluminum foil. Bake for 50–60 minutes (or longer, if potato slices are thicker), until potatoes are so throughout when pierced with a knife. Remove foil and let bake another for 5–6 minutes or until lightly browned (you can also set the oven to broil for just a minute just to get that golden color on top). Remove from heat and let sit for 5–10 minutes before serving.

      • Potatoes Note: I first made this casserole with white potatoes only, then I had the idea to combine them with sweet potatoes. The flavor profile of the dish was elevated, and I loved the contrast between the savory and sweeter bites.
      • I use about half-and-half white and sweet potatoes, but you can vary up the proportions to your own tastes.
      • For a ‘saucier’ casserole, use the lesser amount of potatoes (2 lbs).
      • Toppings Note: Almond meal is a very tasty, and gluten-free substitution. You can use 1/4 cup in place of the 1/2 cup breadcrumbs, or combine with the breadcrumbs (using 1/4 cup almond meal and 1/4 cup crumbs).

      photos credit: Nicole Axworthy

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      Chocolate Vegan Zucchini Bread (dairy-free, vegan, nut-free, oil-free) https://dreenaburton.com/vegan-zucchini-bread/ https://dreenaburton.com/vegan-zucchini-bread/#comments Mon, 20 Aug 2018 01:32:12 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8567 Every summer I have a reader ask “Dreena, do you have a vegan zucchini bread recipe?” For so long I’ve been meaning to create one. In ed&bv I did do a muffin recipe that included grated zucchini. But, not enough for me to categorize it as zucchini bread. At last, the time has come… we...

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      Every summer I have a reader ask “Dreena, do you have a vegan zucchini bread recipe?

      For so long I’ve been meaning to create one.

      In ed&bv I did do a muffin recipe that included grated zucchini. But, not enough for me to categorize it as zucchini bread.

      At last, the time has come…

      we both have a vegan zucchini bread!

      Even better?

      It’s a chocolate vegan zucchini bread!

      CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI BREAD! No grating the zukes here, this one is EASY - and healthy! #wholegrain #dairyfree #wfpb #plantbased #vegan #nutfree #oilfree #zucchini #baking #recipe #quickbread #healthy

      Even better than that?

      You don’t have to grate the zucchini!

      hoo-ahh, I love a kitchen shortcut!

      Actually, I think the reason it took me so long to get to this vegan zucchini bread recipe was the grating.

      Silly, zucchini grates pretty easily and swiftly. But something about grating is a royal pain to me.

      Am I alone here? I don’t think I am, but geez chime in and give me company!

      Don’t worry, there aren’t any chunks of zucchini in this bread. 😷

      Instead, I pop the zukes with all the wet ingredients into the blender and voila! Ready!

      Another perk of this vegan zucchini bread…

      The chocolate disguises the zucchini! You know, for people that may look at it and say “what are those flecks”?

      Chocolate = no questions asked.

      Hope this one is a hit for you, guys! x Dreena

      Chocolate Zucchini Banana Bread

      • 2 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
      • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
      • 2 tbsp coconut sugar
      • 2 tsp baking powder
      • 1/2 tsp baking soda
      • 1/4 tsp sea salt
      • 2 cups thickly sliced zucchini
      • 1 cup sliced ripe/overripe bananas
      • 2/3 cup pure maple syrup
      • 2 tbsp hemp seeds ((can omit if you don't have them))
      • 1/4 cup water
      • 2 tsp vanilla
      • 1/4 cup non-dairy chocolate chips
      1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a loaf pan by spraying/wiping with a touch of oil, and lining with a strip of parchment paper (for easy removal after cooling) In a large bowl, add dry ingredients: flour, cocoa powder, coconut sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir through until well combined. Add zucchini, bananas, maple syrup and hemp seeds (if using) to a blender. Puree until smooth (this takes just a minute in a high speed blender, a regular blender will take longer). Once well pureed, add water and vanilla and blend again. Add wet mixture to dry and stir through until just well combined, and add chocolate chips if using. Transfer mixture to loaf pan. Bake for 50 minutes, or until set in the centre (test with a toothpick if unsure). Remove and let cool in the pan on a cooling rack. Once cool, remove loaf and cut into slices.

      Muffin Swap: If you want to make into muffins, fill 12 muffin cups (lined with parchment liners) and bake for 25 minutes.

       

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      Oil-Free Pesto: Lemony Cashew Basil Pesto (dairy-free, vegan, gluten-free) https://dreenaburton.com/oil-free-pesto/ https://dreenaburton.com/oil-free-pesto/#comments Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:05:31 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8541 Today I’m revisiting my favorite oil-free pesto recipe: another ‘oldie but goodie‘! Back in 2007 my book eat, drink & be vegan was published. What? That was over a decade ago. Seriously, that’s shocking to me! I imagine it’s hard to believe for those of you that have been reading along since the early days...

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      Today I’m revisiting my favorite oil-free pesto recipe: another ‘oldie but goodie‘!

      Back in 2007 my book eat, drink & be vegan was published. What? That was over a decade ago. Seriously, that’s shocking to me!

      I imagine it’s hard to believe for those of you that have been reading along since the early days as well. So much much has changed in our vegan world since then, hasn’t it?

      Think back 10 – even 5 years ago. Vegan is now a word that is largely understood. Stores are carrying vegan cheeses, ice creams, and milks galore! Ingredients like hemp seeds are no longer fringe.

      When I wrote eat, drink & be vegan, vegan was still very much fringe – raising a vegan family was scandalous!

      Vegan cookery was more about proving that vegan dishes could be indulgent and rival their non-vegan counterparts.

      While I haven’t necessarily shied away from indulgent recipes over the years, my recipes certainly have always had the reputation of being ‘healthier’.

      I’ve always used whole-grain flours and less refined sweeteners, and haven’t relied on vegan meat and cheese alternatives.

      My recipes haven’t always been oil-free, but I did use oil much more sparingly than was popular in the era of vegan cooking.

      So, when I wanted to adapt this Lemony Cashew Basil Pesto into a full oil-free pesto, it wasn’t at all difficult. There were only a couple of tablespoons of oil in the entire recipe.

      How does this new oil-free pesto compare to the original?

      Very well! It tastes just as incredibly flavorful. Rich, tangy, ‘cheesy’. Luscious and satisfying.

      The BEST oil-free pesto! LEMONY CASHEW BASIL PESTO - #dairyfree #oilfree #vegan #pesto #basil #recipe #pasta #delicious #recipe #food #plantbased #wfpb

      The only difference to me is how long it keeps in the fridge. With the oil, the pesto seemed to retain its bright color a little better and longer.

      When I make this oil-free pesto, I always make a large batch and then keep extra in the fridge (or freezer) to use for another time. Without the oil, I estimate this pesto is best used within 3 days.

      If you want to keep a little brighter color, just throw in a small handful of italian parsley with the blend. That touch of parsley will always bump up the color!

      Back to the actual pesto recipe. This is one that readers contact me about time and time again. It’s become a favorite with you – and with my family too.

      oil-free pesto

      One of my favorite things to do with this oil-free pesto – apart from the obvious pasta – is to use as a base for pizza. You don’t need cheese, just this layer of pesto and a few choice toppings. It is delectable!

      I’ve created a number of pesto recipes over the years, and this remains one of my favorites.

      I do have one other oil-free pesto recipe that I’ve developed for a book that is my other favorite.

      Anyone want to take a guess which oil-free pesto that is???

      I’ll wait for your guesses in the comments!

      Enjoy the pesto… x Dreena

      LEMONY-CASHEW BASIL PESTO

      Traditional pesto takes on new life with this recipe. Cashews provide a creamy, buttery contrast to the tangy lemon juice. When fresh basil is abundant, this pesto is a must-make! Ingredients (serves 3-4)

      • 3 – 3 1/2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
      • 1 large clove garlic
      • ¾ tsp dry mustard
      • ¾ tsp sea salt
      • freshly ground black pepper to taste
      • 1-3 tbsp water (add as needed)
      • 1 cup + 1-2 tbsp raw cashews (see note)
      • 2½ – 2 3/4 cups packed fresh basil leaves (and tender stems, not stalks)
      • 3/4 lb dry pasta of choice (ex: gluten-free, whole-grain) (see note)
      1. In a food processor, combine lemon juice, garlic, mustard, salt, pepper, and 1 tbsp of water, and purée until fairly smooth, scraping down sides of bowl as needed. If difficult to puree, add a touch more water (keep in mind that some pasta water will be added when tossing through pasta). Add cashews and basil and purée until fairly smooth (may leave some texture). Cook pasta according to package directions. When almost done, remove about 1/2 cup of pasta water and reserve. Drain pasta (do not rinse) and toss with pesto, using as much pesto as desired (see note). If pasta seems too dry, add some pasta water, 1 tbsp at a time, until moistened to preference. Season with additional salt and pepper if desired, and serve.

      Cooking Notes:

      • Use brown rice, quinoa, or other gluten-free pasta for a gf dish; use spelt, kamut, or other wheat-free pasta for a wheat-free dish. Or try raw noodles like zucchini noodles.
      • Raw almonds may be substituted in part or entirely for cashews, just add extra water or oil to moisten when puréeing.
      • You can make this pesto in advance and refrigerate in a sealed container until you’re ready to cook the pasta.
      • When kept thick, this pesto also makes a dynamite sandwich spread or pizza sauce (or dollop on pesto as a pizza topping).
      • I like a lot of sauce on my pastas, but you may prefer less; use up to 1 lb (450 g) pasta and add extra cooking water or oil to help distribute the pesto through the pasta.

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      5 Healthy Salad Dressings and Sauces You Will LOVE (vegan, gluten-free, oil-free) https://dreenaburton.com/5-healthy-salad-dressings-sauces/ https://dreenaburton.com/5-healthy-salad-dressings-sauces/#comments Sat, 04 Aug 2018 20:15:12 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=2943 Update: Get 11 new oil-free dressings here. Healthy salad dressings and sauces are staples for me. They add personality to staple foods like rice, greens, and beans and can take a salad or otherwise routine meal from drab to fab! I love creating saucy stuff (if you have LTEV you already know this). And, I especially love...

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      Update: Get 11 new oil-free dressings here.

      Healthy salad dressings and sauces are staples for me. They add personality to staple foods like rice, greens, and beans and can take a salad or otherwise routine meal from drab to fab!

      I love creating saucy stuff (if you have LTEV you already know this). And, I especially love using a variety of healthy salad dressings and sauces through the summer.

      5 Healthy Salad Dressings and Sauces #vegan #oilfree plantpoweredkitchen.com

      When it’s too hot to cook, you can transform leftovers with a quick-prep sauce, or make the most of those lush summer greens with a punchy salad dressing.

      Dressings and sauces have a reputation for being very heavy, calorie-rich and nutrient-poor.

      But, using plant-based ingredients instead of dairy and highly processed foods…  different story!

      Dressings and sauces CAN be made flavorful and rich with wholesome, nutritious ingredients – and without any processed vegan substitutes like mayonnaise.

      These 5 healthy salad dressings and sauces can be enjoyed any time of year and will complement so many vegan meals – from raw salads to steamed greens – to topping baked spuds or cooked quinoa – or as dips with crudite or bread.

      Ready? Let’s go!

      1. Moroccan Carrot Dip

      Moroccan Carrot Dip from Let Them Eat Vegan

      Moroccan Carrot Dip

      This is more of a dip than a dressing, but can be thinned out slightly for a dressing, or used thicker for a dip or sauce. The Moroccan seasonings give a sprightly, spicy twist.

      • 1 cup raw carrot (cut in discs or small chunks (roughly 4 – 4 1/2 oz.))
      • 1/3 cup raw cashews
      • 2-2 1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar or coconut vinegar
      • 1 small clove garlic (or ½ medium clove)
      • ½ – 1 tsp fresh ginger (peeled and roughly chopped)
      • 1/8 tsp cinnamon (little scant)
      • ½ tsp ground cumin
      • ½ tsp ground coriander
      • ¼ tsp ground fennel
      • ¼ tsp rounded sea salt (plus more to taste if needed)
      • Freshly ground black pepper (use conservatively)
      • ½ cup water (or more to thin as needed, see note)
      1. Using a standing blender (high-powered blender like a Blendtec works best to smooth), puree all the ingredients (starting with 2 teaspoons of the vinegar) until very smooth. Taste and add extra vinegar if you wish, and season with additional salt and pepper, if desired. For a thinner dip, add more water (plus another 2 to 3 tablespoons more, if desired, to thin out a little more for use as a salad dressing). Makes about 1 1/4 cups.

      Healthy Salad Dressing and Sauce Suggestions: Surprise your guests with this uniquely flavored and colored dip—try serving as a centerpiece dip for crudités or with raw dipping breads. Also try tossing it into a salad, for a more substantial lunch salad.

      2. Raw-nch Dressing!

      Raw-nch Dressing from Let Them Eat Vegan

      Raw-nch Dressing

      Creamy and rich, my raw version of Ranch Dressing from Let Them Eat Vegan takes any green salad from ordinary to extraordinary!  Also try massaging it into hardy greens like kale. (photo credit: foodfitnesslifelove)

      • ½ cup raw cashews
      • 2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
      • 1 ½ tsp red wine vinegar (gives more flavor, but can use more lemon juice or apple cider vinegar for a raw version)
      • 1 tbsp raw tahini
      • ¼ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley (roughly chopped)
      • 2 tsp fresh chives (chopped (optional, and can use more onion powder))
      • 1/8 tsp garlic powder (see note)
      • 1/8 tsp onion powder (see note)
      • ¼ tsp Dijon mustard (omit for raw version)
      • 1/2 tsp scant sea salt
      • 1/8 tsp freshly black pepper to taste
      • 1 tsp raw agave nectar (adjust to taste)
      • 1/2 cup water or non-dairy milk (or more to thin as desired)
      1. Using a blender (I use Blendtec) or an immersion blender and deep cup or jar, puree all the ingredients until very smooth (it will take a couple of minutes). If you want to thin the dressing more, add water to your preferred consistency. This dressing will thicken some after refrigeration. You can thin it out by stirring in a few teaspoons of water, or keep it thick and use it as a dip for raw veggies.  Makes about 1 ¼ cups.

       

      Flavor Tip: I prefer a faint seasoning of garlic and onion in this dressing. I use just 1⁄8 teaspoon of the onion and garlic powders to lend a hint of flavor but not overwhelm the dressing. If you like more seasoning, feel free to use more onion powder (or extra chives), and more garlic powder (or even a tiny clove of garlic). Alternatively, you can omit both powders, if you prefer.

      Savvy Subs and Adds: Try 2 tablespoons of fresh dill to replace some or all of the parsley.

      3. Citrus Tahini Dressing

      Citrus Tahini Dressing from Let Them Eat Vegan

      Citrus-Tahini Dressing

      This healthy homemade dressing is slightly thick, thanks to the inclusion of tahini. The flavors are kid friendly, and so it makes salad recipes a little more interesting for the little ones. Another one from my “Saucy and Dippy” chapter in LTEV!

      • 3 tbsp freshly squeezed orange juice
      • 1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
      • 2 tbsp tahini
      • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar or coconut vinegar
      • 2 – 2 ½ tbsp agave nectar or pure maple syrup (adjust based on tartness of orange juice
      • 1 1/2 – 2 tsp dijon mustard
      • ½ – 1 tsp fresh ginger (roughly chopped)
      • 1 very small clove garlic (optional)
      • ½ sea salt
      • Freshly ground black pepper
      1. Using a standing blender or an immersion blender and deep cup or jar, puree all the ingredients (starting with 2 tablespoons of the agave nectar/maple syrup, until fully smooth and creamy. Add additional sweetener to taste, if desired. Makes a little over 1/2 cup.

      • Kid-Friendly: When I omit the garlic and use the lesser amount of ginger, my kids really like this dressing.
      • Healthy Salad Dressings Suggestions: Try this on finely julienned greens. It is especially great with kale, as it helps mellow the flavor of the leaves. Chop your kale, then toss the dressing onto the leaves. Let sit for 10 or more minutes to allow the dressing to soften the greens. Add other salad fixings you might like, such as cherry tomatoes, grated carrot, chopped apple, or dried cranberries.

      4. Curried-Almond Dressing

      This is the recipe for the KALE-SLAW that many of you already know and love.  But this dressing is looking for some new greens partners, like romaine, spinach, and escarole!

      Kale-Slaw with Creamy Curried Almond Dressing by Dreena Burton - #vegan #soyfree #glutenfree

      Curried Almond Dressing (for kale-slaw)

      This plant-powered dressing will definitely cling to your greens, and can easily be used as a dip as well. It is one of my favorites, with a very subtle curry flavor in a creamy, slightly sweet base. This is also the dressing for Kale-slaw with Curried Almond Dressing, a modern makeover of traditional coleslaw.

      • 1/2 cup raw almonds
      • 2 1/2 tbsps apple cider vinegar
      • 2 tbsps agave nectar or pure maple syrup
      • 2/3 cup water (or more to thin as needed; see note)
      • 1 very small clove garlic
      • 1 tsp freshly grated ginger
      • 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
      • 1/2 tsp sea salt
      • Freshly ground black pepper (optional)
      • 1/8 tsp (or more) curry powder (or more to taste (see note))
      1. Using a standing blender or an immersion blender and deep cup or jar, puree all the ingredients (starting with 1⁄2 cup of the water) until very smooth. (A high-powered blender such as a Blendtec works best to smooth out the dressing; using an immersion blender or regular blender will leave a little more texture and take a little longer.) Add additional curry to taste, and additional water to thin as desired (see note).  Makes about 1 generous cup.
      • Flavor Tip: I like using about 1⁄8 rounded teaspoon of curry powder in this dressing, for a very muted flavor. But if you love curry, feel free to use more than this, adjusting to your own taste.
      • Healthy Salad Dressings Serving Suggestions: If using as a dip, use just 1⁄3 to 1⁄2 cup of water to puree and then refrigerate it, adding extra water later, if desired, to thin (it will thicken considerably after chilling). If using as a salad dressing, you can keep it thick, or thin it more as you prefer.

      Kale-Slaw (see dressing recipe above) (recipe from "Let Them Eat Vegan"

      I’ve never cared much for traditional coleslaw, as I’ve never cared much for cabbage. But this slaw is a fresh take with nutrient-rich kale, along with crunchy carrots, fennel, and a touch of sweetness from apples and cranberries. The dressing really brings this slaw to life—don’t skip it!

      • 1 small to medium-size apple (cored and julienned (3⁄4 to 1 cup), tossed in 1tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice)
      • 2 1/2 – 3 cups julienned kale (leaves cut/torn from stems and stems discarded (see note))
      • 1 1/2 cups grated carrot
      • 1 cup very thinly sliced or julienned fennel
      • 1/4 cup cranberries or raisins
      • 2/3 – 3/4 cup Creamy Curried Almond Dressing (or more, if desired; recip follows)
      • 2 to 4 tbsps sliced or chopped raw almonds ((optional))
      • Extra salt and pepper to taste
      1. Place the apple, vegetables, and cranberries in a bowl and toss. Add the dressing, starting with about 2⁄3 cup and adding more as desired, if you want a thicker coating of dressing. Toss to coat well, then let sit for 5 minutes or more to allow the kale leaves to soften slightly in the dressing. Serve, garnishing with a light sprinkling of almonds (if using( and extra salt and pepper, if desired. Makes 5 1/2 – 6 1/2 cups.

      Notes:
      Kale salads can be quite versatile. Try another thick, creamy nut- or seed-based dressing, such as Citrus Tahini Dressing, Creamy Cumin-Spiced Dressing, or DJ’s Hummus Salad Dressing. The key is to coat the leaves nicely, and let the salad sit for a few minutes before serving.

      Savvy Subs and Adds:

      – If fennel isn’t your thing, substitute julienned jicama, thinly sliced celery (cut on a diagonal), or julienned red bell pepper, or some combination of these ingredients.

      – If you aren’t sure if you’ll like this much kale in the salad, try starting with 2 to 21⁄2 cups, making up the difference with extra grated carrot or fennel.

      – Other veggies you can consider adding include chopped or finely sliced cucumber, red bell pepper, cherry tomatoes, grated beet (“pretty in pink” salad, anyone?). Or try some zucchini ribbons: Use a vegetable peeler to make thick ribbons—these can be the base of a salad all on their own! And other dried fruit, such as apricots, goji berries, and raisins, can be interchanged with the cranberries, if you prefer.

      5. “Magical” Oil-Free Vinaigrette

      YES, this salad dressing is oil-free, low-fat, nut-free, vegan... AND delicious! Magical Applesauce Vinaigrette plantpoweredkitchen.com #vegan

      Full details and recipe here.

      Another to try: Creamy House Dressing

      Creamy House Dressing - from the Plant-Powered 15 by Dreena Burton

      photo credit: Nicole Axworthy

      I’m not counting this in the five, because the recipe isn’t posted (it’s from my Plant-Powered 15 ebook).

      If you have the e-book, DO try this dressing!

      It’s been getting crazy-yummy reviews. Literally, that’s what I’ve heard: “it’s crazy yummy, I’m licking the blender“.

      Don’t forget there are 11 more healthy, oil-free salad dressings here.

      Have you tried any/many of these healthy salad dressings? What are your favorites? 

      Have fun with the recipes! x Dreena

      The post 5 Healthy Salad Dressings and Sauces You Will LOVE (vegan, gluten-free, oil-free) appeared first on Dreena Burton.

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      Your Guide to Yoga At Home: How I Developed My Yoga Practice https://dreenaburton.com/yoga-at-home/ https://dreenaburton.com/yoga-at-home/#comments Mon, 30 Jul 2018 01:12:38 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8428 Yoga At Home: The Post! Well, it took more than a year to write this, hopefully it’s worth the wait! It all started with this FB post. I was a little shy to share a photo of myself doing yoga. My husband snapped a few pics and encouraged me to post them. Outside of food,...

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      Yoga At Home: The Post!

      Well, it took more than a year to write this, hopefully it’s worth the wait!

      It all started with this FB post.

      I was a little shy to share a photo of myself doing yoga. My husband snapped a few pics and encouraged me to post them.

      Outside of food, I’m rather private about my life I guess. I’m not one to share many selfies or a lot of personal photos, so sharing these felt awkward.

      However yoga has become a larger part of my life, and I want to share how we can all bring a little yoga into our lives.

      Yoga had a presence in my life many years ago. Not my own practice, but I remember my mother doing yoga poses when I was quite young.

      Yoga wasn’t well understood then. It was rather fringe and ‘uncool’.

      I remember my mother wearing leotards much like these, and striking similar poses. Unfortunately, yoga was mocked then, and as a child I had no interest in it.

      It wasn’t until many years later that I discovered yoga for myself. I started doing some yoga videos (a là vhs, back in the day)!

      It was still just an occasional thing for me, however, and at times felt foreign, like learning a new language.

      When I was expecting our first daughter I noticed a flyer about pregnancy yoga while picking up produce from our local organics farm. I signed up, and also enrolled in yoga again with my subsequent pregnancies.

      These yoga classes taught me more about the breath work, and focus and meditation, and also rest. It wasn’t the intense physical practice that many of us envision for yoga now.

      Sure, there were poses that required strength and stretches that you felt the next day, but pregnancy yoga offered more. That yoga helped my breath work during labor, and also gave me something to tap into through other challenging times.

      Exercise and fitness has been part of my life since my late teen years. I wasn’t a sporty child or particularly active in my youth, so I learned everything later on my own.

      For many years I exercised at home, then at gyms. But once I began having children, I shifted to exercising primarily at home.

      It was only natural that my yoga practice would also develop at home. I was already using videos, recordings, and later youtube videos to do things like step workouts, strength training, and rebounder workouts.

      Going into my 40s, though, I began to tire of many of these workouts. I didn’t feel my body was benefitting from them as it had before, or maybe mentally I wasn’t and that reflectedin my body. It was all very mundane and uninspired.

      Enter yoga.

      Yoga picked up where all the other fitness left off. It offered more than just the exercise, also incorporating breath, meditation, body awareness, and honoring our limits.

      This past year I immersed myself more in yoga. It seems the more you do, the more you want to learn and explore.

      Then, in the new year, I decided to commit to one of the 30-day programs offered on youtube. I’ve done them in other years, but never managed to finish during the 30 days. This time, I did.

      Once the month of yoga was finished, I felt sad that it was over! I enjoyed coming to my mat every day, even if for ten minutes. That’s when I realized I wanted to work more with yoga in my life.

      Now, yoga is a daily practice for me, whether for a half-hour, hour, or ten minutes. Most days it is yoga at home. If I want the full hour, I go to our local hot yoga studio.

      click photo for #hummusisafoodgroup tank

      I’ve only been going to a studio since the spring. It was part of my new year’s goals to take some yoga workshops and classes.

      I’ve done two workshops and have a membership with the hot yoga studio. Going to a studio was intimidating for me. I imagined joining a class of very experienced yogis as if walking into a lululemon retreat.

      Yes, my imagination got the better of me. The first workshop I took I was pleased to join women of all ages and fitness levels. The second workshop was a little different, more experienced yogis, however it was a class that was also intended for yoga teachers.

      I began yin classes at a studio, and really loved them. The only challenge is that they were 75 minutes long. With commute time, that’s a large chunk of time to carve out of a morning.

      Soon after, I bumped into a friend at my second home, and she asked if I’d ever done hot yoga. No!

      Here’s the thing. The idea of hot yoga appealed to me. It’s warm in there! But, again, I imagined joining a room of more experienced yogis and not being in the moment.

      Screw that! It was my new year’s commitment to explore classes. I walked into a Sunday morning class (which happened to be one of the busiest, eesh), and joined in. I loved it. I didn’t love how crowded the class was, but loved the experience.

      This studio also offers a Bikram 90 in 60 class. That is, the Bikram style condensed in 60 minutes instead of 90. I hadn’t done any bikram at home, so entirely new to me. I didn’t know about it via youtube, and it’s actually hard to find similar classes online.

      This Bikram 90 in 60 class has become my favorite studio yoga class. Why? The series of poses allows you to ‘know what’s coming next’ and also to see how you’re progressing through the weeks and months.

      Moreover, it’s not weight-bearing on the wrists and elbows. At least not the class I attend. No (or very few) downward dogs. No planks. No side planks. I love doing all of these poses, but have found the swift flow from one to the other brings about elbow pain. So I’m cautious with these flows in regular classes, and quite love the Bikram classes.

      Getting back to yoga at home!

      This fall I’m registered for yoga teacher training. I’m excited and nervous all at once. Once I finish, I hope to share some regular short videos for yoga at home on youtube. I’ve already created a youtube channel, jump over to subscribe.

      As with this post, I feel vulnerable creating a yoga youtube channel. It will share more of myself personally than with my vegan food channel. That will be part of my journey, I know, and I hope it will help you as well. So, I begin.

      Benefits of Yoga at Home

      • anytime (anywhere!): It’s your schedule, you can choose what time of day you want to practice. You can also choose where in your house – or outside. When we vacation in Osoyoos, I bring my ipad out to the grass and bliss out in sunshine yoga.
      • affordable: Other than the cost of your wifi to access youtube or other online classes, yoga at home is pretty much free.
      • yoga clothes optional: Practice in whatever clothing you like. Shorts, sweatpants, pjs! For me, I get in the ‘yoga vibe’ much more when I pull on my yoga pants. But, you don’t have to have an ample yoga wardrobe or spend that much money. Until I started going to a studio in recent months, I had just a couple pairs of yoga pants and sports bras. I will say I enjoy having more yoga items to wear now, especially well-fitting items, but getting started use whatever you are comfortable wearing.
      • no commute time: When you practice at home, you don’t need to drive to a studio, looking for parking, or show up early to ensure you find your zen spot. Studio classes are typically an hour or more, so when you build in the time getting to and from, it adds at least another 30-45 minutes. Plus, I tend to do slightly shorter yoga practices at home, anywhere from 30-45 minutes. That often gives me what I need, and I save a lot of time.
      • focus on areas/avoid areas: Do you have sore wrists? A persnickety knee? When you practice in a studio, you don’t often know what moves a class will involve (unless it’s a structured series like Bikram). That means you need to modify during class or rest it out in child’s pose or another posture. At home, you can search videos for styles and also to avoid areas. For instance, my elbows have become glitchy in recent years. Like a tennis elbow, but I call it mom elbow. 😆 On days when my elbows are feeling especially sensitive, I search for ‘wrist-free’ or ‘hands-free’ yoga. Bingo, classes that don’t involve downward dog or other postures where the arms are bearing weight.

      my headstand wip!

      Possible Challenges of Yoga At Home

      • no social connection: If you are someone that is motivated by a class setting or really enjoy partnering with friends for exercise, you may find yoga at home isolating. I’ve always exercised at home from cardio to strength-training, so I’m comfortable with this space.
      • self-motivation: as I mentioned above, I’ve become quite accustomed to exercising at home, so I guess that discipline is quite ingrained now. Even when staying in hotels on occasion, I have done some yoga using a bath towel on the carpet in my room. Because as Lesley often says “some yoga is better than no yoga”! I will say that it’s easier for me to be motivated with yoga at home than other exercising I’ve done in the past. Because it’s more than exercise, and very enriching and nourishing. So, I encourage you to try it even if you feel self-motivation hasn’t worked for you with other fitness in the past.
      • alignment issues: this is a fuzzy area because every body is different. As such, we will not have same posture, movement, or positions in poses. However, there are some alignment specifics that can be important if not essential in many areas, and we may miss these through yoga at home. Having said that, through all the studio classes I’ve been taking since the new year, I’ve only noticed a handful of instances where an instructor has assisted a class member with alignment. I expected to see teachers assisting participants more often. I gather that personal touch has become a delicate area now, so teachers generally offer verbal cues more than physical.
      • home distractions: for anyone that has ever worked at home or worked out at home, you know there are always distractions – especially with children! With yoga, it can be especially challenging when you are in a pose or calm state and hear “mom, where is ____”, or “I’m telling mom!”, or “I’m done!“… along with the dog barking! We can view it as frustrating — or, use it as a tool to help us strengthen our focus. (Yeah, let’s go with that.)
      • little/no Bikram: as I mentioned above, I’m loving the Bikram style, and there aren’t many videos online. Studios may offer classes like Bikram or other styles that are more specialized and challenging to learn at home. If you do know of online Bikram classes, please share!

      My favorite YouTube Channels for Yoga at Home

      Brett Larkin

       When I discovered Brett’s channel, I actually emailed her and said “how did I not find you on youtube before now?” I found Brett’s channel through Lesley Fightmaster’s videos (see below), as they were doing a video swap for their audiences. I immediately connected to Brett’s style. Over time, I’ve come to love her channel more and more, and it’s the one I use most often at this time.

      What I love about Brett’s channel is that she is very diversified. She offers the swifter vinyasa flows, but also offers yin yoga, and other styles like kundalini and myofascial release. Her deep love for yoga and helping people along their journey shines through. A few months ago I joined Brett’s uplifted program. There’s a fee, but it might be worthwhile to you for yoga at home practice (it has been for me).

      Lesley Fightmaster

      I went through a long phase using Lesley’s videos, and still use them. I love her smile and infectious energy that can draw you into the class. She ends every class with a quote and that really helps me zone down into the last resting pose before moving on with my day. I’d say most of her classes are swifter moving vinyasa flows, however she does offer other styles like restorative yoga as well.

       

      Yoga with Kassandra

      I discovered Kassandra this past year. While she includes vinyasa flows, her focus is yin yoga. So for those of you looking for more restorative sessions, definitely check out her channel.

       

       

       

      Travis Eliot

      I believe there are only a few full videos on this channel (remainder are highlight videos), but there are two yin videos I quite love.When I want a shorter but very effective, soothing yin practice, I choose one of these two. These couple of videos have become a bit of a staple, hopefully Travis will upload more videos soon!

       

      Eckhart Yoga

      This is a channel I discovered earlier on. I think Esther was one of the first yoga ‘youtubers’. I tune into her channel for some shorter focused videos, such as core strength or working on specific poses. Many of the videos on this channel are short, so it’s a great place to tap into for home-based learning. I also really enjoy Esther’s very real presence, and how she brings students and other practitioners into the videos.

      Sarah Beth Yoga

      I used Sarah’s videos much more when I was beginning my yoga at home. Not because it’s a beginner’s channel, but because many of her videos are styled with shorter and longer lengths, well suited to beginners. I really enjoyed working on the shorter class, then trying the longer class. I also quite liked the background music and brightness of the videos, as well as the focus on “movement with breath”. I haven’t been using her videos as much lately, but definitely recommend her channel.

      Yoga with Tim

      Not all yoga youtubers are women. Not all at-home yogis are women, either. I think men would enjoy some of these videos, but I also have used Tim’s videos many times.

       

       

       

      Yoga with Adriene:

      Search yoga on youtube and you’ll find a slew of videos from Adriene. She is undoubtedly one of the most popular yoga instructors on youtube (if not the most). Adriene has a quirky yet sensible and practical approach to yoga, and really helps you feel welcome to yoga. I think my home practice really grew the most when I followed Adriene’s 30 days of yoga series. For at least the past three years, Adriene has done a 30-day program in the new year. I feel immersing yourself in a program like this (other yoga instructors also host programs like this in the new year), it can really help you connect with yoga at home in a new or deeper way.

       

      Annie Clarke

      The uploads to Annie’s channel aren’t as frequent, but Annie’s channel has some very lovely videos for yoga at home. I enjoy the pace of Annie’s flows, and her sequences. She has a steady, grounding presence.

       

       

      Yoga in Melbourne

      There aren’t as many videos on this channel, but there is something very soothing about Paula’s voice, even in the more energetic vinyasa flows. I’ve enjoyed several of her videos, and encourage you to try them.

       

       

      Cosmic Kids Yoga

      I must mention the Cosmic Kids Yoga channel for our wee ones to join yoga at home. Our youngest would often roll out a mat after I practiced and pick out a yoga routine. It’s really charming, and young children really gravitate to it. She now feels it’s ‘too kiddish”, so I’d say it’s a great channel for children from about 3 to 8.

      Props for Yoga At Home

      As I mentioned, you can save money on clothing with a home yoga practice. A good yoga mat is important, however, and some props can be very useful. Here are a few I use myself:

      Yoga Mat: I layer up my mats, using one on top of the other. Even when going to a studio I do this, rolling up two mats and toting to and from class. I need that padding for my knees and elbows, and just for comfort in any pose. I’m always surprised to see people using very thin mats – ouch! But every body is different, and while I love a good cushion, others prefer a thin mat. I picked up my mats locally, but if I were to buy another mat I’d look into these:

      Clever Mat: It has some great reviews, wider and longer than many mats, and affordable.yoga mat

       

      Jade Harmony Mat: This is a more expensive mat, but has great reviews, and is made from natural rubber. Also, they plant a tree for every mat sold.

      Gaiam Mat: This is one of the more well known brands, and it’s also quite affordable. Lifeforme Mat: This one’s an investment for sure, but has excellent reviews and I love the idea of alignment markers to assist with yoga at home. 

      Yoga Blocks

      While some may say this isn’t an essential yoga item, I feel it is. At one point, I never used them, and we can mistakenly think that using a yoga block (or other prop) is ‘slacking off’.

      In fact, using a block or bolster or other prop in a position can assist you to open in areas where you need to, thereby improving the pose and also deepening your breath. It can also assist with balance, help you graduate through poses, and assist with tight areas.

      click photo for info on tank top

      A yoga block is also especially useful for restorative yoga. So don’t think it’s a sign of weakness to use one. How you use it will depend on the type of yoga you are doing, and your individual body (we are all built differently).

      The most common blocks are foam and cork. Foam blocks are the most affordable, and also the type most often in yoga studios (at least in my experience). They are also lighter and softer on the body for restorative practice.

      Cork blocks are more expensive and also more eco-friendly. They are firmer so better for balance poses requiring more stability. What do I have? Foam. I purchased them a few years back locally. They were inexpensive, and serve me quite well!

      Yoga Strap

      Yoga straps are quite inexpensive, so not a big expense for yoga at home. Still, if you don’t have one, a scarf or towel can often stand in to assist with stretching. I’ve had a yoga strap for many years, and use it occasionally for stretching but also use it to tie around my rolled yoga mats to keep them tidy and when I do tote them to a studio.

      Yoga at Home Q & As

      When I asked about this on facebook, I received a number of excellent questions. Some I’ve already addressed. Here are a few others:

      Q. Do you meditate?

      A: I do. In the mornings, before I start my day. It may be for only 5 minutes, and usually not more than 10-15. I do feel most yoga practices incorporate some meditation, yet a few minutes before starting the day is always helpful for me. That might be another post altogether!

      Q: How long you been doing yoga? I’ve been off the mat for a decade and am trying to get back to it?

      A: I started with pregnancy yoga way back, but didn’t do it regularly. I dabbled here and there, then about 5 years ago I started doing it more regularly at home. I do something just about every day. Not always long practice, and just five minutes if that’s all that’s available. But even that something makes a difference. I encourage you to find just 5-10 minutes to return to yoga rather than an hour class which can be challenging to fit in for many of us.

      Q: I would love to practice Yoga but find it difficult to get started. Need a simple suggestions to get started.

      A: Start with just 5-10 minutes a day. Rather than feeling overwhelmed with an hour-long or even half-hour practice, start with something that is very doable every day. You will feel good about showing up for yourself on the mat for those minutes, and it will develop into a habit. It doesn’t have to be every day, but it will become more of your norm, like getting a shower. Then, you can choose to build in longer practices here and there during the week. To find guidance for 5-10 minute practices, simply link to one of the suggested youtube channels above and go to their playlists. Most of the yoga youtubers classify their classes by length and style.

      Q: I’ve been wanting to practice at a studio, but haven’t made the time for myself. I just may have to start setting an alarm everyday to get even 10 minutes in per day. How do you stay on track?

      A: I think you’ve answered the question! As with the previous question, committing to even 10 minutes a day really can make a difference in your life. If you can find that sweet spot in the day that’s best for you (for me it’s morning, for you it might be lunch or before bed), make that your routine. Once you feel more connected to the practice, choose one day a week to go to a studio. Buy a set of classes rather than a monthly membership. Perhaps one day on the weekend, or one evening a week. That will give you some momentum with classes at a studio vs yoga at home. Combining the two has been wonderful for me.

      Q: How can I do yoga, I’m not flexible!

      A: You don’t have to be flexible to do yoga. This may be the equivalent to protein in the vegan diet! Your flexibility will improve over time, and yoga is for everybody. There are beginner classes, and poses can be modified. I see people of all ages and yoga experience in the studio. This is one of the beautiful aspects of practicing yoga at home. You can build your practice and feel more confident before going to more intense levels of practice at home – or in studios.

      Has this post helped you? It was a long one! It took me some time to gather my thoughts and plan for this post, so I truly hope it gives you a little yoga at home inspiration. Please share your thoughts here in the comments, and also any youtube recommendations you have. 

      Blessings… x Dreena

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      Sugar-Free Popsicles: Watermelon Raspberry Pops https://dreenaburton.com/sugar-free-popsicles/ https://dreenaburton.com/sugar-free-popsicles/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 17:04:47 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=8409 Today I have a recipe for easy — naturally sweet — sugar-free popsicles! Popsicles are simple to make, and you can really have fun with the flavors. Of course homemade popsicles are also much healthier than store-bought that typically add sugar – as well as artificial colors and flavors. While it’s easier to find fruit-sweetened...

      Read More

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      Today I have a recipe for easy — naturally sweet — sugar-free popsicles!

      Popsicles are simple to make, and you can really have fun with the flavors. Of course homemade popsicles are also much healthier than store-bought that typically add sugar – as well as artificial colors and flavors.

      Pictured, r-l: Watermelon Raspberry, Mango Tango, Melon Freshers

      While it’s easier to find fruit-sweetened popsicles now, they can be pricey, and sometimes the flavors don’t appeal to our kiddos (or maybe that’s my experience). 🙄 When you make pops at home, you can choose the fruits you and your kids like, and then choose to sweeten if needed.

      When summer is in swing, it’s a prime time to make sugar-free popsicles.

      Fruits like berries, melons, and stone fruits are especially sweet because they are ripened locally (or closer to home). Unless fruits are naturally more sour (ex: some citrus) or not fully ripened, you don’t usually need added sweetener.

      SUGAR-FREE Popsicles: Watermelon Raspberry Pops! #vegan #dairyfree #popsicles #sugarfree #easy #summer #food #fruit #raspberries #watermelon #wfpb #glutenfree #plantbased

      In Plant-Powered Families, I offer quite a few natural popsicle recipes. From melon freshers, to piña cooladas, peach-split, and a few others… including these Watermelon Raspberry Pops (aka pink-sicles)!

      In addition to these recipe, I share some steps and tips for making popsicles. While homemade pops are easy to make, there are some tricks to make it simpler. I’ve noted a few relevant tips in this Watermelon Raspberry Pops recipe, but refer to the book for more details – and of course, more refreshing, sugar-free popsicles!

      Pictured, front-back: Peachsicles, Berry Blasters, Pina Cooladas!

      Enjoy the pops and the summer sun!

      Blessings… x Dreena

      Watermelon Raspberry Popsicles

      Refreshing sugar-free popsicles that taste like summer!

      • 2 cups cubed watermelon
      • 1 cup raspberries (or sliced strawberries)
      • Seeds from 1 vanilla bean (optional)
      1. Puree the watermelon and berries in a blender until smooth (a high-powered blender works best, but standard blender works fine too). If using the vanilla bean seeds, use a sharp knife to slice the bean lengthwise. Open the bean and use a dull knife to scrape out the seeds. Add to the blender and briefly pulse/puree to incorporate. Pour into ice pop molds (see notes) and freeze until set.
      • A good blender is very useful for pureeing whole fruits smoothly. A high-powered blender (ex: Blendtec) is best, but a standard blender or even an immersion blender—will work.
      • Use seasonal and ripe organic fruits. If certain fruits are out of season or not available fresh in your area, choose frozen organic.
      • Molds with individually set ice pops are easier to use than molds that group all the ice pops together. You can then remove one at a time by running the mold under warm water, rather than trying to remove a single pop from a joined tray. Also, molds that offer sticks with adjoined “drip trays” make for cleaner pop-eating! Here are some BPA-free molds that will work well.
      • When filling molds, leave about 1/4” of space at the top of the mold, as the mixture will expand slightly when freezing.
      • On average, pops take 4–5 hours to set.
      • If you do want to sweeten more, try 1-3 teaspoons of pure maple syrup

      photos credit: Nicole Axworthy

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      Hearty Vegan Burgers: Nutty Veggie Burgers (vegan, gluten-free, soy-free) https://dreenaburton.com/hearty-vegan-burgers/ https://dreenaburton.com/hearty-vegan-burgers/#comments Tue, 03 Jul 2018 19:53:09 +0000 https://dreenaburton.com/?p=1231 Over the years I’ve developed many recipes for hearty vegan burgers. Store-bought veggie burgers have improved in taste and texture, but for me they still never compare to homemade. Homemade always better, right? Plus, you can really tweak seasonings like dried herbs and spices, and also salt – whereas you “get what you get” with...

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      Over the years I’ve developed many recipes for hearty vegan burgers. Store-bought veggie burgers have improved in taste and texture, but for me they still never compare to homemade.

      Homemade always better, right? Plus, you can really tweak seasonings like dried herbs and spices, and also salt – whereas you “get what you get” with commercial burgers.

      It’s funny, though, because I think vegan burgers are still perceived as being bland or not very satisfying.

      It feels like a long time ago since I wrote LTEV, but must reference it in this post because I have a full chapter on hearty vegan burgers in that cookbook. I wanted to show people that homemade burgers are far better than storebought, more satisfying, and can hold their own on a burger bun!

      When I wrote Let Them Eat Vegan, our girls were younger and a little fussy about veggie burgers. Store-bought burgers were far too spicy for them, and if they saw pieces of onion, mushrooms, or bell peppers in a patty they would try and pick them out. Plus, many burgers didn’t hold up well on a burger bun.

      So, I set out to create a collection of hearty vegan burgers that kids and adults would both enjoy – and that would be easy to make.

      HEARTY Vegan Burgers: Dreena's Nutty Veggie Burgers! Delicious and EASY! #vegan #glutenfree #soyfree #wfpb #oilfree #burgers #veggieburgers #vegetarian #meatfree #healthy #recipe #meatless #easy #delicious #hearty #filling #food #plantbased #wholefoods

      These Nutty Veggie Burgers are one of our favorites. They are dense and toothsome, and very satisfying. Since they have a base of nuts, along with vegetables and oats, they are one of the more filling vegan burgers.

      These Nutty Veggie Burgers also hold up well on a bun, and they are EASY! So easy that there is no sauteing of onions or other ingredients before working the mixture together. Instead, all the ingredients go straight into the food processor. The machine does all the work, apart from shaping the patties!

      To cook, you can bake or pan-fry (a non=stick works best). Then, serve up on a bun (or in a pita or green wrap). If you have Let them Eat Vegan, be sure to try the Almonnaise and Sunshine Fries to pair with these burgers. Quite a delicious way to round out these hearty vegan burgers!

      hearty vegan burgers

      Hope you really enjoy these… more soon! x Dreena

      Nutty Veggie Burgers

      These are HEARTY VEGAN BURGERS, they will satisfy vegans and omnivores alike. EASY to make!

      • 1 ½ cups raw almonds
      • 1/2 cup raw walnuts
      • ½ cup raw pecans (or more walnuts)
      • 1 small clove garlic (roughly chopped/sliced)
      • ½ tsp sea salt
      • 1 tbsp tomato paste or ketchup
      • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
      • 1 tbsp tamari (SOY-FREE: use coconut aminos )
      • 1/4 tsp poultry seasoning or 1/8 tsp each of dried thyme and ground sage
      • ½ cup finely grated carrot (packed)
      • ½ cup finely grated zucchini (packed)
      • ½ – 1 cup rolled oats (see note)
      1. n a food processor, add almonds, walnuts, pecans, garlic and salt. Puree until the nuts are finely ground. Then add ketchup, nutritional yeast, tamari, poultry seasoning (or thyme/sage), carrot and zucchini, and pulse through until the mixture becomes dense and is starting to hold together, and then pulse in oats. Remove blade, and shape into patties. To cook, you can either bake or pan-fry. To bake, place shaped patties on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake about 9-10 minutes on each side. I prefer these burgers pan-fried. To do so, use a good non-stick skillet. Place patties on skillet over medium heat. Cook patties, about 5-7 minutes on first side, and then another 3-5 minutes on second side until golden brown. Serve with lettuce, tomatoes and fixings of choice. 

      • Using ½ cup of oats will firm the patties up nicely enough, and you can use up to 1 full cup of oats for even firmer patties. 
      • If you’d like to make this into a loaf, it works pretty well. Press into a lightly oiled and lined (with a strip of parchment, for easy removal) loaf pan. Cover with foil and bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes, uncovering for the last 5-10 minutes just to lightly brown the top. Let cool for 5-10 minutes in the pan, and then use the parchment to lift the loaf out of the pan to slice.

      image credit: Hannah Kaminsky

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